How to Freeze Eggs

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how to freeze eggs

The winter of 2013/2014 was our first snowy season as chicken owners. I say was with a small amount of sarcasm since the snow just doesn’t seem to want to let go. (The three-foot-deep mounds in our backyard have melted to nothing in some places, but every few days it snows it again. Meanwhile Easter is only weeks away…) We were prepared for a reduction in egg production and made a plan for getting as many winter eggs as possible without causing too much stress to our hens. What we didn’t prepare was the most abysmally, blisteringly cold and long winter in the last thirty years. Though our egg production was decent for the conditions, it’s understanding that we went 8-10 weeks with nothing but hungry, cold hens.

It was a far cry from September days when I looked in the cupboard at three dozen eggs and thought “Well, it looks like quiche again for dinner!”

So you can imagine my delight in early March when I optimistically checked the nesting box and found… wait for it… an egg! A glorious, brown egg. (Though at the moment it looked more golden than brown. I’m pretty sure angels were ascending and descending on the coop and I heard the faint sound of harps surrounding me. At least I think…)

Double my delight when two eggs began showing up… then four… and now for the last week, we’re back up to one egg per hen – six eggs a day!

Now that I understand the feast or famine reality of owning a laying flock, I’m all the more interested in preserving our excess for use in our lean days. Otherwise stated, I want to purposefully preserve our extra eggs during warm weather to use next winter. After some research there are two options I want to explore: Dehydrating and freezing eggs.

We’ll save dehydrating for another day. Today, I want to teach you how to freeze eggs. You might not have laying hens to keep up with, but if you find a great deal on eggs, you can stock up to save now without worrying about them going bad. Here’s how it works.

How to Freeze Eggs

I thought it best to freeze eggs in pre-measured portions. It is possible to just freeze a big glob of egg in a freezer-safe plastic bag or container, but I thought that sounded like a conundrum at baking/thawing time. I opted to freeze my eggs in a muffin tin. An ice cube tray might also work but I think the small size would be problematic.

To begin, line the muffin tins with butter or coconut oil to make it easier to remove them later. I used coconut oil. Mix one egg at a time with a whisk or fork. I mixed mine in a liquid measuring cup to make pouring easier. My tiny whisk (which I actually almost threw away a couple of weeks ago!) ended up working better than my giant hand mixer.

how to freeze eggs

how to freeze eggs

Initially I was whisking two eggs together and pouring them into each muffin cup. Turns out that’s way too much and I ended up with leftovers, even when I chose one small and one large egg. One egg per muffin tin works much better.

how to freeze eggs

You can see that the first two cups (upper-left) are practically overflowing! One egg is plenty; don’t try to add two!

Once I filled each muffin cup I covered the whole tin with a sheet of wax paper to keep any random bits of debris in my freezer from finding their way into my eggs.

how to freeze eggs

how to freeze eggs

Freeze the eggs the overnight (at least 12 hours) before removing them. Your one-egg-sized portions can be stored in a freezer-safe plastic bag or some other freezer-safe container. I wanted to store ours in wide-mouth canning jars because we’re trying to get away from using plastic. However, my goal is to save 25 dozen eggs over the summer which results in way too many jars (2 per dozen). With that in mind, I’m opting to freeze our egg-discs into freezer bags which will lay flat and stack nicely in the freezer.

how to freeze eggs

how to freeze eggs

What do you think? Would you freeze eggs? I can’t wait to see what they taste like!

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